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About This Tool

Purpose

The Veterans Energy Pipeline website was developed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) to help facilitate employment of transitioning service members and veterans in the oil and natural gas industry.

Target Audiences

The tool is intended to serve two primary audiences:

  • Military service members who are leaving the service and veterans who want to understand how their military training and experience might help them qualify for jobs in the oil and natural gas industry. They can:
    • Learn About Energy Careers, including: Industry Highlights, Job Demand and Pay, Veterans in Industry, and Employment Resources
    • Use the Military Occupation Search to search by military occupation code for related jobs in the oil and natural gas industry
  • Oil and natural gas hiring managers and employers interested in learning about how military training and experience applies to their jobs and how they can find qualified veterans to fill these positions. They can:
    • Learn About Military Careers, including: Military Workforce Structure, Military Training and Education, Potential Labor Pool, and Hiring Veterans
    • Use the Civilian Occupation Search to search by one of the top 70 oil and natural gas industry jobs and find what military occupations match these jobs

Methodology for Linking Military Occupations to Top Oil and Natural Gas Industry Jobs

The features of this site that allow you to search by military occupation or civilian occupation are based on detailed analysis comparing military occupations to the top oil and natural gas industry jobs. This analysis, sponsored by API, employed detailed task information for civilian occupations to create a more informative link between military and civilian occupations. The results of the analysis show which job tasks military and civilian occupations have in common, and overall, how closely they are related. The analysis includes the following steps:

Step 1:

Collect Military and Civilian Job Task Data

  • Military Job Duty Descriptions and Tasks
  • O*NET Description and Detailed Work Activities (DWAs)
  • Collect DMDC MOC to O*NET Crosswalk

Step 2:

Refine Crosswalk to Top 70 Oil and Gas Jobs

  • Refine DMDC MOC to O*NET Crosswalk
  • Identify additional MOC to O*NET linkages

Step 3:

Conduct Job Task Comparison

  • Compare Military and Civilian Job Tasks
  • Assign Relatedness Factor to Each Civilian Task (DWA) using Military Job Task Data:
    • Related
    • Somewhat Related
    • Not Related

Step 4:

Determine MOC to Civilian Occupation Linkage

  • Calculate Weighted Average of MOC Relatedness to Civilian Occupation
  • Assign Final Linkage:
    • Most (70% or more)
    • Some (40% to 69%)
    • Few (10% to 39%)

Step 1: Collect Military and Civilian Job Task Data

The first step in the analysis process involves collecting available job task data for the occupations identified in the top 70 jobs in the oil and natural gas industry, job tasks and duties for enlisted and officer personnel in the military, and the most current Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) Military Occupation Code (MOC) to O*NET crosswalk. Analysts gather data from military job duty descriptions and task lists, and O*NET’s occupational descriptions and Detailed Work Activities (DWAs).

Step 2: Refine Crosswalk to Top 70 Oil and Gas Jobs

The DMDC maintains a crosswalk that links military occupations to primary and secondary O*NET codes and is the starting point in any military to civilian occupational matching. In this step, the DMDC crosswalk is reviewed for appropriateness and additional linkages are added as necessary.

Step 3: Conduct Job Task Comparison between Military and Civilian Job Tasks

A job task comparison is then conducted between the military and civilian job tasks using military job duties and descriptions and civilian occupation DWAs. Using the detailed work activities as the common base, each DWA is evaluated against the known military job duties of an MOC and assigned a relatedness factor of Related, Somewhat Related or Not Related. The results of the comparison show where the job tasks overlap (Related), where the job tasks are similar but not exact (Somewhat Related), and where civilian job tasks are not performed by the military job (Not Related).

Step 4: Determine MOC to Civilian Occupation Linkage

The final step in the analysis process is to determine the overall linkage between the military and civilian occupations using the results of the job task comparison. First, a relatedness percentage in the form of a weighted average is calculated for each MOC-civilian occupation combination, giving Somewhat Related tasks less weight. Second, a linkage category is assigned based on the relatedness percentage. The linkage categories are defined as:

  • Most: Most tasks performed in civilian occupation (70 percent or more) are duties performed by service members in the corresponding military job.
  • Some: Some tasks performed in civilian occupation (between 40 to 69 percent) are duties performed by service members in the corresponding military job. These occupations may require additional training, education, or experience.
  • Few: Some, but fewer tasks performed in civilian occupation (between 10 to 39 percent) are duties performed by service members in the corresponding military job. These occupations are likely to require additional training, education, or experience.

Analysis Notes, Assumptions, and Limitations

  • The results of the job task comparison are dependent on the depth of information available for a military occupation. Detailed job task information is not available for every MOC; some MOCs have been analyzed on job descriptions alone.
  • Not all military tasks are documented at the same level as the detailed work activities. Service members are assumed to have performed selected DWAs even if not explicitly stated in the available documentation. For example, one DWA is “Clean work areas.” Although not addressed in job descriptions or task lists, it is assumed that service members are able, and required, to keep clean work areas; this DWA was marked as “Related.”
  • Individual experiences in a military occupation will vary. Duty stations, types of assignments, career specialties, and training courses attended all combine to create the skill set of an individual service member.